Seton Hill University

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Seton Hill University

For nearly 90 years, Seton Hill University has provided students with a Catholic, liberal arts education in the tradition of Elizabeth Ann Seton and rooted in Judeo-Christian values.

An educational institution that was founded for girls by Mother Aloysia Lowe and the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill in 1883, St. Joseph Academy at Seton Hill, evolved into Seton Junior College in 1914. In 1918, the school received its charter from the College and University Council and became Seton Hill College. Effective July 1, 2002, Seton Hill College officially became Seton Hill University. A dream became a reality—a dream that started with seven students. Today, Seton Hill University’s student population exceeds 1,800.

The early curriculum at Seton Hill was adopted and administered by Sisters Mary Electa Boyle, Marie Elise Blouin, and Mary Frances Urnauer. The Congregation maintained its oversight of Seton Hill through the Board of Corporations and Board of Directors who controlled finances and made decisions.

During the 1950s, approximately 60% of the faculty at Seton Hill were Sisters of Charity. With the increase of lay faculty members through the 1970s and 1980s, the number of Sisters of Charity serving as faculty members has diminished. However, the Sisters of Charity remain ever present at Seton Hill University, serving as administration and faculty members and Board of Trustees members. The strong traditions and ideals brought forth by the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill in 1883 still exist at Seton Hill University today. Paralleling the values of the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, Seton Hill University has a commitment to community outreach and service to others. In the spirit of its founders, Seton Hill students are encouraged to use their knowledge, skills, and talents to bring about transformation in the world.

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